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How to Turn Google BigQuery Into A Powerful Marketing Data Warehouse

The Martech 5000 supergraphic highlights the big challenge facing marketers. As more products, tools, and platforms arise, so too does the amount of data marketers need to gather, monitor, and analyze.

To further compound this challenge, Scott Brinker, the man behind marketing’s most famous infographic, recently said that, “In some ways, forget about martech 5,000. Welcome to martech 50,000.”

This means it’s those companies and marketing teams who can better leverage the available data that will gain a competitive advantage over their competition.

Typically, spreadsheets have been the go-to option for marketers when it comes to gathering data in one place, but even they have their limits.

So, what’s the next option marketers have when it comes to gathering big data in a large repository?

The answer is a data warehouse.

What Is BigQuery & Why Should I Care?

Google BigQuery is a fast, scalable, and fully managed data warehouse that enables large-scale analytics.

There are multiple reasons why marketers should store their data in Google BigQuery.

Limitless Data

If you’ve used Google Sheets or Excel for marketing data analysis, you’ll know that spreadsheets have a limited capacity.

But in BigQuery, you can store an unlimited amount of data, which means you can transfer literally all your marketing data from every platform into one centralized place.

Access All Your Historical Data

Many native platforms limit the amount of historical data you can access. For example, Google Search Console offers six months of historical data within its native interface.

And while applications built on top of its API increases that figure to 16 months, you still don’t have a full overview of your past performance.

But with BigQuery you can use it to store all your past data, giving a complete overview of your historical performance.

Data From Different Platforms

As we saw in Brinker’s supergraphic, marketers have a lot of data on a lot of platforms.

Gathering all that together in one centralized repository is the only way to create a single source of truth for your marketing performance.

Analyze on a Granular Level

Within each marketing platform, you have a number of metrics and dimensions you can dig into.

However, when exporting your data into BigQuery you’ll often be able to have your data at a higher granularity than what is possible within these native interfaces.

For example, when transferring data from Google Analytics or Adobe Analytics into BigQuery, you be able to get granularity on an event or user level.

So say you run an ecommerce site, this lets you perform a deep path analysis to identify which are the most common page paths of your website visitors and how those paths differ between those who purchased and those who were just browsing.

This analysis would not be possible within native UIs as they don’t provide raw events data.

With BigQuery, it provides a whole new opportunity to really dig into your data and achieve levels of granularity not offered within native interfaces.

How Can I Easily Pull My Data Into BigQuery?

So how can you actually get your data in BigQuery?

Well, that’s exactly why we built Supermetrics for BigQuery.

Quite simply, it’s the first native BigQuery Data Transfer Service app that lets you move data from all your non-Google marketing platforms (including Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, Bing, and more) into BigQuery.

In addition, you can also move data from Google platforms that haven’t been integrated with BigQuery, such as Google Search Console and Google My Business, whilst also getting Google Analytics without the needing to pay for GA 360.

At Supermetrics, our mission is pure and simple: to let marketers easily move their data from wherever it is to wherever they want.

All our products are made by marketers, for marketers, and that’s why we wanted to make it super simple to transfer your data into BigQuery.

We eliminated the need to know the technical details of how to move your data and understand the basics of SQL. Instead, you just select what data you’d like to move into BigQuery and Supermetrics takes care of the rest.

Being able to extract the depth of data from your marketing platforms is also a vital component of conducting sophisticated analyses.

That’s why we spent a lot of time and effort to ensure our connectors provide marketers with more metrics and dimensions than any other BigQuery application available.

Furthermore, the data is also pre-transformed by our predefined schemas. This basically means that once your data is in BigQuery, you don’t need to do anything to it and it will be presented in the format marketers need.

How Can I Visualize My Data That’s in BigQuery?

Once you have your data in BigQuery, then comes the fun part: exporting it to visualization and BI tools.

Products like Tableau, Looker, and PowerBI provide robust platforms to turn your data into charts so you can monitor, analyze, and report on your marketing performance.

And in order to create a full end-to-end solution for marketers, we also built a dedicated connector to Google Data Studio so you can take all your data through BigQuery and into Data Studio using Supermetrics.

There are several benefits to the Data Studio connector that comes baked into Supermetrics for BigQuery, as it:

  • Automatically merges data from multiple sources without needing to write SQL.
  • Sets data types for all your fields with friendly naming structures (For example, “Account name” instead of “account_name”).
  • Adds calculated metrics like CTR, eliminating the need to manually define formulas.
  • Automatically includes time fields like week, month and year, which you would normally need to configure.

BigQuery: Common Use Cases for Marketers

There are endless scenarios for which marketers can use BigQuery, but here are three common ones to help get you started.

Cross-Channel PPC Analysis

Gather data from your PPC campaigns that run across multiple channels to identify which platforms are performing best for each campaign.

With Supermetrics for BigQuery, you can now pull data from heavily used paid marketing platforms including Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Bing Ads into BigQuery so you’re able to do this.

This means you’ll have all of your data in a central location and can create all-inclusive visual reports of your blended data.

This, in turn, will ensure smarter allocation of your performance marketing budgets and improved ROI.

Web Analytics + CRM

It’s vital that digital marketers understand visitor behavior before and after conversion. Prospects often interact with several pages and content pieces across multiple visits before they do convert.

Pre-conversion, all this user data will be tied into a unique and anonymous cookie ID, which can be sent to Google BigQuery.

Once a prospect converts, they’d then have a CRM record ID, which in turn can be associated with their anonymous cookie ID by sending the cookie ID to the CRM upon conversion.

With Supermetrics for BigQuery, you can track both pre- and post-conversion on-site activity from Google Analytics and combine it with enriched data from your CRM to generate an in-depth understanding of your prospective customers.

Attribution Analysis

Modern buying behavior makes attribution challenging.

As we discussed in the previous use case, it’s difficult to attribute every conversion to just one specific channel or touchpoint.

So gathering all the touchpoints someone has with you, across different channels, via multiple sources, and both pre- and post-conversion lets you not only gain a better understanding of your marketing funnel, but also – and more importantly – your customer journey.

Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/supermetrics-google-bigquery-marketing-data-warehouse/306115/

4 Major Marketing Trends for 2020 and Beyond

Can you believe it’s almost 2020? When I began my marketing career over a decade ago in 2009, I could hardly imagine what I’d be doing today as a marketing leader at an enterprise organization especially with technology. But each year, new and disruptive technological innovations are forcing marketers like me to evolve our best practices. Digital marketing, once the only game in town, has given way to multichannel marketing; and today, we are rapidly approaching the omnichannel marketing age.

And that can be overwhelming: As the rate of marketing innovation continues to accelerate, most organizations are having a hard time keeping up. But the good news is that new ways of doing things bring new opportunities. Here are four major marketing trends I see developing among organizations for 2020 and beyond:

1. Optimizing for on-SERP SEO

Ever hear of zero-click results? You’ve probably seen them. A zero-click result is a search result in which Google automatically provides the answer to the search query in the form of an automated snippet.

For example, if you type in ,“What is the temperature in San Francisco?” Google will automatically provide you a result it generates on its own. You’d actually have to scroll down to see the Adwords results and organic search results.

Google auto-populates search results for much broader queries, as well. Everything from “What is a cryptocurrency?” to “How do I create a marketing funnel?” has a snippet that may prevent a searcher from scrolling down to see more results.

Why is this significant? Because 61.8 percent of search results in Google are now zero-search results, according to data from Jumpshot. As a result, more and more keywords are becoming less profitable.

While the automatic snippet sometimes comes from a website that ranks somewhere on page 1 of the search engine results page (SERP), companies are unsure how to optimize their content so that Google chooses them over anyone vying for the same spot. Needless to say, this is a concerning development for any business that markets or advertisers on Google.

Opportunity:The brand that figures out on-SERP SEO first will have a huge competitive edge.

2. Advertising on smart speakers (and optimizing for voice search)

Another major development in recent years has been the proliferation of smart speakers. In 2018, around 56 million smart speakers were sold to consumers, according to Social Report.

Yet despite the growing number of households asking Alexa, Siri and Google Home questions, smart speaker marketing and advertising opportunities have been scarce. But this seems to be changing.

In 2017, for example, Google Home users noticed that a universal ad for Disney’s Beauty and The Beast began playing shortly after scheduled morning announcements, called flash briefings. These types of ads were rare and infrequent at the time, but are now growing in popularity.

In 2019, we’re seeing better, less invasive, examples of branded advertising on smart speakers. One of the most customer-friendly ways to advertise on smart speakers is to make what’s called a “branded skill.” For example, if you tell Alexa “Ask Patrón for a cocktail recipe,” Alexa will respond with a diverse selection of possibilities, courtesy of the premium tequila maker. This strategy works:. Patrón gets more than 6,000 queries a month for its Alexa skill, according to Digiday.

Opportunity: Try the “branded skill” approach for your branded advertising, for a more customer-friendly tone.

3. Optimizing for voice search

Granted, most brands may not be ready to explore smart speaker advertising just yet. But in the meantime, they should explore optimizing their content for voice search.

According to Google, 20 percent of all Google search queries now take place through voice search. Even more telling is that 71 percent of all mobile users between the ages of 18 and 29 use voice assistants on their smartphones, according to Thrive Analytics.

Needless to say, it probably makes a lot of sense for all businesses to start optimizing their content for voice search, not just big enterprises. There’s a lot of advice from marketing experts on how to do this, and it seems that the consensus is that making content more conversational does the trick.

Opportunity: With most search happening on smartphones, optimize for voice search.

4. More chatbots and, yes, even more content!

Finally, as I’ve explained before, written content isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. Not only is it predicted to be the marketing activity that will make the largest commercial impact three years running (according to Smart Insights), but written content is also the main throughput of chatbots, which are expected to see increased usage in 2020 and beyond.

According to a recent study by Juniper Networks, as AI-powered chatbots grow in popularity and sophistication, retailers can expect to cut costs by $439 billion annually and increase sales by $112 billion, by 2023. With numbers like that, it’s not too hard to see why large organizations will continue investing in newer and more helpful chatbots.

But chatbots aren’t useful just for big business. Any business that has a website with traffic can benefit from a simple chatbot that answers the most common visitor questions and helps convert visitors into warm leads.

Opportunity: Chatbots will help you cut costs.

Marketing is changing, and marketers must change with it

When I first got my feet wet in the marketing world, I couldn’t have imagined that I’d be helping run digital marketing transformation programs. But that’s what it takes to stay competitive in the world of 21st-century marketing.

It’s almost 2020; have you looked into any new and innovative ways to spend your marketing dollars? Or how to double down on the marketing channels that work best for your business?

Because if you haven’t, I guarantee your competitors have.

Source: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/333697

4 Major Marketing Trends for 2020 and Beyond

Can you believe it’s almost 2020? When I began my marketing career over a decade ago in 2009, I could hardly imagine what I’d be doing today as a marketing leader at an enterprise organization … 

… especially with technology. But each year, new and disruptive technological innovations are forcing marketers like me to evolve our best practices. Digital marketing, once the only game in town, has given way to multichannel marketing; and today, we are rapidly approaching the omnichannel marketing age.

And that can be overwhelming: As the rate of marketing innovation continues to accelerate, most organizations are having a hard time keeping up. But the good news is that new ways of doing things bring new opportunities. Here are four major marketing trends I see developing among organizations for 2020 and beyond:

1. Optimizing for on-SERP SEO

Ever hear of zero-click results? You’ve probably seen them. A zero-click result is a search result in which Google automatically provides the answer to the search query in the form of an automated snippet.

For example, if you type in ,“What is the temperature in San Francisco?” Google will automatically provide you a result it generates on its own. You’d actually have to scroll down to see the Adwords results and organic search results.

Google auto-populates search results for much broader queries, as well. Everything from “What is a cryptocurrency?” to “How do I create a marketing funnel?” has a snippet that may prevent a searcher from scrolling down to see more results.

Why is this significant? Because 61.8 percent of search results in Google are now zero-search results, according to data from Jumpshot. As a result, more and more keywords are becoming less profitable.

While the automatic snippet sometimes comes from a website that ranks somewhere on page 1 of the search engine results page (SERP), companies are unsure how to optimize their content so that Google chooses them over anyone vying for the same spot. Needless to say, this is a concerning development for any business that markets or advertisers on Google.

Opportunity: The brand that figures out on-SERP SEO first will have a huge competitive edge.

Related: How an Alexa ‘Skill’ Can Boost Your Brand

2. Advertising on smart speakers (and optimizing for voice search)

Another major development in recent years has been the proliferation of smart speakers. In 2018, around 56 million smart speakers were sold to consumers, according to Social Report.

Yet despite the growing number of households asking Alexa, Siri and Google Home questions, smart speaker marketing and advertising opportunities have been scarce. But this seems to be changing.

In 2017, for example, Google Home users noticed that a universal ad for Disney’s Beauty and The Beast began playing shortly after scheduled morning announcements, called flash briefings. These types of ads were rare and infrequent at the time, but are now growing in popularity.

In 2019, we’re seeing better, less invasive, examples of branded advertising on smart speakers. One of the most customer-friendly ways to advertise on smart speakers is to make what’s called a “branded skill.” For example, if you tell Alexa “Ask Patrón for a cocktail recipe,” Alexa will respond with a diverse selection of possibilities, courtesy of the premium tequila maker. This strategy works:. Patrón gets more than 6,000 queries a month for its Alexa skill, according to Digiday.

Opportunity: Try the “branded skill” approach for your branded advertising, for a more customer-friendly tone.

3. Optimizing for voice search

Granted, most brands may not be ready to explore smart speaker advertising just yet. But in the meantime, they should explore optimizing their content for voice search.

According to Google, 20 percent of all Google search queries now take place through voice search. Even more telling is that 71 percent of all mobile users between the ages of 18 and 29 use voice assistants on their smartphones, according to Thrive Analytics.

Needless to say, it probably makes a lot of sense for all businesses to start optimizing their content for voice search, not just big enterprises. There’s a lot of advice from marketing experts on how to do this, and it seems that the consensus is that making content more conversational does the trick.

Opportunity: With most search happening on smartphones, optimize for voice search.

4. More chatbots and, yes, even more content!

Finally, as I’ve explained before, written content isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. Not only is it predicted to be the marketing activity that will make the largest commercial impact three years running (according to Smart Insights), but written content is also the main throughput of chatbots, which are expected to see increased usage in 2020 and beyond.

According to a recent study by Juniper Networks, as AI-powered chatbots grow in popularity and sophistication, retailers can expect to cut costs by $439 billion annually and increase sales by $112 billion, by 2023. With numbers like that, it’s not too hard to see why large organizations will continue investing in newer and more helpful chatbots.

But chatbots aren’t useful just for big business. Any business that has a website with traffic can benefit from a simple chatbot that answers the most common visitor questions and helps convert visitors into warm leads.

Opportunity: Chatbots will help you cut costs.

Marketing is changing, and marketers must change with it

When I first got my feet wet in the marketing world, I couldn’t have imagined that I’d be helping run digital marketing transformation programs. But that’s what it takes to stay competitive in the world of 21st-century marketing.

It’s almost 2020; have you looked into any new and innovative ways to spend your marketing dollars? Or how to double down on the marketing channels that work best for your business?

Because if you haven’t, I guarantee your competitors have.

Source:https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/333697

A Primer for Using Music in Marketing

Brand Playbook looks at best practices for using copyrighted music–and how to avoid snafus

Indoor cycling company Peloton pedaled into some legal trouble in March—to the tune of $150 million—when the brand was sued for trademark infringement by a group of music publishers representing the likes of Lady Gaga and Bruno Mars. For Peloton, which has made a name for itself by selling a fitness experience built on music, the lawsuit exemplifies a larger issue that newer brands face as they grow from scrappy upstart to seasoned marketer.

“The small startups may get away with using music without a royalty for a couple of reasons: They’re unknown to musical artists or their publishing houses, or they’re just too small to be bothered with,” says Scott Rogers, a partner in the copyright and trademark litigation group at the law firm Ulmer & Berne. “But as companies grow, continued use of unlicensed music certainly has the potential to be a real problem for them.”

When Peloton debuted seven years ago, it was relatively small and unknown. But the brand has exploded in popularity in recent years, investing more in marketing and introducing a new treadmill product as it prepares to go public this year. While it eventually removed classes featuring songs by the popular artists in question, it has also changed tactics, recently counter- suing the group of music publishers, alleging anticompetitive behavior.

“Very often there’s a cavalier attitude toward licensing music, even though music is a big part of what they’re doing,” says Owen Sloane, partner in the entertainment, media and arts department at law firm Eisner, noting the risks could include complaints from brand investors.

Experts say there are several strategies marketers can employ to avoid musical snafus—as well as the unwanted press that goes along with them—and also get the most bang for their buck. Some tactics could even improve brands’ use of music in their marketing by encouraging more consumer engagement.

“Brands that incorporate a good music strategy play a role in the consumer’s life beyond the product,” says Eric Sheinkop, author of the book “Return of the Hustle: The Art of Marketing With Music,” and an executive board member of SoStereo, a company that provides sonic identities for brands.

Try a cover
Marketers that might not be able to afford the costs of securing licenses from all of the creators involved with a song—writers, publishers and
artists—could opt for a cover version of the song instead. In this strategy, the brand only needs to get rights from publishers and, in some cases, from others, but covers are much cheaper options, experts say. Brands could also personalize cover songs for different markets—an Italian version in Italy, for example.
“It gives you the ability to localize anthems or campaigns by doing covers,” says Sheinkop.

Experiment with shorter terms
When Budweiser aired its Super Bowl spot earlier this year, it paid top dollar for the rights to Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind” to promote its use of wind power—but those rights were only for a limited time, compared with the typical three-to-six-month minimums. Anheuser-Busch InBev had the Dylan rights for two weeks before turning to a rerecorded version of the song by the Cloves for future broadcasts. Using short-term rights is a smart way to save money but still make a big splash, experts say.

Do it in stages
Some music publishers are willing to work on alternative plans for startups short on cash, according to Sloane. He says that startups could devise a contract with a publisher that starts with a less expensive license, and builds to something more lucrative as the brand becomes more successful and has more money to allocate to music license fees. While this practice is not widespread, it could work for marketers like Peloton, which start small and grow more popular.

Mix it up
Some brands have found success in both avoiding lawsuits and keeping costs low by using a mix of music sources. Zumba, the global fitness brand based in Hallandale Beach, Florida, creates one-third of its music in-house as exclusives; sources one-third from lesser-known, independent artists; and licenses hits from established, popular musicians for the last third. The formula has worked well for the company, which can also claim it “discovered” several musicians who went on to larger success and recognition, such as Jenn Morel and Don Omar. Zumba works with thousands of artists.

“The Zumba experience has many different elements,” says AlbertoPerlman, CEO at the 18-year-old brand, noting switches from Reggaeton to hip-hop to salsa, for example. “When we can’t find the right song we say, ‘Let’s create one.’”

Consider tapping technology
There’s also more technology available to help marketers find the best music mix for their brands. Sheinkop’s company SoStereo has developed an AI tool that will create music in the vein of popular songs already in existence.
“It’s not all or nothing,” Sheinkop says, referring to the choice between expensive big-name artists or bland elevator music. “There’s a lot of opportunity in-between.”

Source: https://adage.com/article/cmo-strategy/primer-using-music-marketing/2170871

We have to stop marketing junk food to children

Imagine being able to walk into a grocery store with your children and not have to fend off endless demands to buy kid-branded food products because there are none in sight. This peaceful scenario could become a reality if Bill S-228 passes in the Canadian senate.

The bill, introduced in 2016 by former senator and Olympic ski champion Nancy Raine Greene, would prevent food and beverage companies from marketing to children under age 13 across all forms of media – TV, Internet, billboards, magazines, radio, bus stop posters, and even food packaging itself. Marketing of foods and beverages that contain more than 5 percent of the recommended Daily Value (DV) for sodium, sugar, or saturated fat would be restricted. Currently, this includes the vast majority of foods that are typically marketed to kids. Mary L’Abbé, researcher at the University of Toronto, wrote in the Star that her lab has examined more than 15,000 foods (roughly three-quarters of the Canadian processed food market):

“We found that with the proposed DV threshold, only 16 percent of all products could be marketed to kids, and just 2 percent of products which currently have child-directed packaging meet the threshold.”

So, it’s clear that such legislation would have a serious effect on manufacturers, which is why they’re fighting it fiercely and the bill has stalled after its third reading in the Senate last fall. The CBC recently published a confidential letter from the heads of advertising, food processing, and retail companies, asking senators to withhold their support.

This is unacceptable, considering the good such a bill could do. Children are vulnerable citizens, lacking media savviness and susceptible to popular opinion. They are developing their own taste preferences and establishing eating habits that will stick with them for life (or be very hard to shake, especially if they’ve gained weight at a young age). They are also in great need of healthy nutrients to support rapid physical and mental growth. Dietitian Cara Rosenbloom makes the argument in Today’s Parent:

“There’s a known correlation between current food marketing and the rising rates of childhood obesity and chronic diseases including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some types of cancer. Currently, 90 percent of the foods marketed on TV are high in salt, sugar, calories and fat, and that’s what our children are being encouraged to eat.”

Bill S-228 would work in two ways, as described by Prof. L’Abbé in University of Toronto magazine (Spring 2019):

“It reduces the amount of marketing that children and parents are exposed to, and it also works as an incentive to the food industry to reformulate foods. We saw that happen with trans fats: virtually every company has reformulated their foods to get below the regulations.”

Both points are important, but I think the latter is particularly profound. Of course people need to take responsibility for themselves, but for too long we’ve shouldered all that responsibility without expecting much from the companies that produce and sell us our food. It’s the same argument we’ve used many times on this website for plastic packaging; it shouldn’t be our job to clean up the detritus of a broken system.

This has to change. To quote L’Abbé again, “We want more of the onus to be put on the system rather than the individual to find the healthiest food… We want to help minimize the [parent’s] struggle.”

Source:https://www.treehugger.com/health/we-have-stop-marketing-junk-food-children.html

6 ways to effectively market an AI startup

No startup is easy to grow, and with more and more artificial intelligence (AI) companies being founded around the world, the reality is that they can’t all lead the way. Some will struggle along for years, unable to find any real traction, while others will perish completely shortly after they’re funded.

As a founder or marketer, you need to be able to effectively communicate your value proposition. People respond to great products, so it’s crucial to understand that product is the new marketing.

Only the strongest, smartest, and most creative will survive and thrive. Like any product or service, the ones that do come out on top will be the ones that add the most value to users’ everyday lives.

That’s not to say, though, that you can’t give your own AI startup an edge by properly nailing down your marketing — and that’s what we’re going to talk about here.

Here are six actionable tips for getting the most out of your marketing strategy.

1. Have a no-BS approach to AI

This one is pretty simple, but it’s worth touching on because it’s something which, bizarrely, is seen all too often. Only market yourself as an AI startup if you’re actually doing AI.

With AI being the relative newcomer on the Silicon Valley block, it’s tempting for companies to say they’re the latest and greatest “AI-powered travel startup” — you can insert pretty much any industry in there, by the way.

Be careful not to add AI to comms or value prop if what you’re doing doesn’t actually revolve around AI. It might seem like a cool idea now, but marketing yourself as an AI startup when you’re not can lead to problems down the road with both customers and investors.

2. Be visual and show users how it works

It’s no secret that a lot of people are visual learners, and when it comes to communicating a product, there’s no better way of grabbing someone’s attention than with great visuals.

Give your customers a peek under the hood of your product. Sure, you can show them screenshots, GIFs, and videos of your product in action — and I highly recommend you do — but giving them an idea of how it all works is great, too.

MightyAI does this well on its products page with clear visuals and animations that help prospective customers visualize its data ingestion solution in action. Powerful visuals can help you democratize your solution, no matter how complex it actually is behind the scenes.

3. Talk about ROI, not just tech

It’s easy as AI entrepreneurs to get wrapped up in features and tech speak, but your customers probably don’t care as much as you about the ins and outs.

Yes, it’s good to show them how things work under the hood, but ultimately you’re selling a service, and what they want to know first and foremost is how your product is going to:

  • Boost their sales
  • Streamline their processes
  • Minimize their losses
  • Reduce business costs, and
  • Improve customer relationships

Contextualize your value proposition in relation to your customers’ pain points. Take ROSS Intelligence, for example. ROSS is a legal research platform powered by artificial intelligence, which helps users to quickly determine the answers to legal research questions.

What they’ve done nicely is communicate that they are first and foremost an AI company but that their goal is to help people find answers to legal questions in seconds. Less about the tech, more about the benefits.

4. Show them case studies

It’s important to write up case studies of the customers you work with.

Why? Because AI is, for most non-technical people, somewhat of an enigma. Even if you’re able to communicate the benefits of your service to them through bullet points and visuals, it might not hit home completely until they see evidence of your success, through someone else.

For example, automation unicorn UiPath offers a variety of compelling customer stories on its website to showcase its powerful solution applied in the real world.

Case studies help demonstrate tangible value creation and guide prospective clients toward use cases that fit their context and needs.

5. Build a killer demo

This goes back to the point about visual learning and touches on the above point, too. Your product ought to be able to speak for itself, and one of the best ways to allow it to do that is through a clear and engaging demonstration.

Show people how product in action, and they’ll do the rest, imagining themselves reaping the benefits of what you have to offer. Lobe does a great job of this with a highly visual and practical demo that puts its technology in context for the uninitiated.

6. Offer free webinars and consulting sessions

Talk directly to your customers. I mean actually talk to them, with your voice. Webinars and consulting sessions are an invaluable way not only to answer questions people may have about your product but also to create excitement, build a community, and get people onboard to promote your product for you.

Marketing should be about showcasing your best ideas to the right people in ways they understand and find valuable. Product deep dives, thought leadership, and a consultative selling approach are keys to earning your customers’ attention, trust and, ultimately, their budget.

You can have the best idea in the world, but marketing and growth can make or break your company. As the AI landscape becomes more competitive and democratized, understanding how to effectively market yourself to people from all walks of life, will be key to your success.

Source:https://venturebeat.com/2019/03/12/is-your-company-missing-essential-data/

Cause Marketing Isn’t Working for Young People

Trends show that young people gravitate towards brands with purpose. Stand for something, Gen Z says, and we’ll reward your company with our attention and dollars. 

According to new research out this month from DoSomething Strategic, a social impact consultancy, marketers are struggling with putting the ideals of cause marketing into practice as brands focus on individual campaigns and not deeper meaning. 

“Marketers are missing the mark in how to get [cause marketing] right and use it as a connection point,” said Meredith Ferguson, managing partner at DoSomething Strategic. “If you do cause marketing, you need to understand it’s deeper and more than a simple campaign.”

The report, which surveyed 1,908 DoSomething.org members ages 13–25 about their awareness of 88 retail and consumer brands’ support of social causes, platforms and issues, found that two out of three young consumers (66%) say that a brand’s association with a social cause positively influences their overall impression of the brand. Moreover, 58% say this association will affect their likelihood of purchasing that brand. 

However, across the 88 brands tested—like Dove, Patagonia, Nike, DSW and Axe—an average of just 12% of respondents had “top of mind” associations between brands they were familiar with and a social cause of platform. The report also notes that “77% say that they at least sometimes purchase products or services from a brand solely because they believe in the brand’s values/reputation and want to support them. And roughly two out of five young people do this regularly.”

This doesn’t mean that committing to a “cause” isn’t working; the marketing isn’t, Ferguson said.

According to Ian Schafer, CEO of social movements events business Kindred,this research might indicate that many brands aren’t doing a good enough job with both communication and living their purposes. 

“Just because a brand aligns itself with an issue or cause in a TV spot (which Gen Z is way less likely to see, mind you) doesn’t mean it is making purpose inextricable from its brand,” Schafer said. 

Schafer added that, when done well, a modern brand lives at the intersection of purpose and company behavior. Given that, according to this study, two-thirds of Gen Z say purpose contributes positively to their brand experience, that’s reason enough to not just communicate the brand’s commitment but live it in their actions for the sake of customers and employees.

“An authentic, well-communicated purpose also does something else,” Schafer said. “It creates benefit of the doubt in the minds of young consumers when something inevitably goes wrong. For a generation that is expert at finding the information it needs, purpose is a critical insurance policy.”

Purpose marketing, Zenith Media’s head of innovation, Tom Goodwin, said “is one of those vague tactics that has the benefit of feeling right and doesn’t seem to be too tarnished by not really being true, meaningfully precise or remotely useful, except vaguely directional.”

Connor Blakley, Gen Z marketer and CEO of CB Projects, which develops and manages Gen Z influencers in impact-driven verticals, said that purpose is subjective, with brands trying to please everyone instead of just making decisions to create a real community.

“Our whole life is personalized. We expect brands to come meet us where we are at instead of trying to get us to go to them,” Blakley said.

It’s not just fishing where the fish are but also meeting this audience where their emotions are. Or, as Ferguson noted, where their psychological states are.

So, how does that line up with brands that define themselves as purpose driven?

According to Kantar’s Purpose 2020 report, which looks at how brands think of purpose, those brands that fall into a purpose-led strategy “stand to grow at twice the rate of those without any higher-order societal aim,” according to a statement. The report found that almost two-thirds of millennials and Gen Z want “brands that have a point of view and stand for something.”

Source:https://www.adweek.com/brand-marketing/cause-marketing-isnt-working-for-young-people/

Cardano (ADA) revamps the marketing strategy: Subreddit and Twitter channels grow massively

  • Cardan subreddit grows from 200,000 to 400,000 in less than two months.
  • Cardano brand awareness on the rise on Twitter and other social platforms following the internal restructuring.

Cardano has from its inception kept a small marketing profile compared to other crypto projects like Tron (TRX). Several bodies have been in charge of Cardano’s marketing over the years including IOHK, Emurgo and Cardano Foundation. However, the primary responsibility for the Cardano Foundation is to market the network. However, the community has felt that the organization is not up to the task.

The community said that the organization did not meet its obligations, in turn, sparking an internal conflict. Petitions emanated from the community that pushed for the removal of the chairman of the Foundation, Michael Parsons. This particular petition gathered thousands of signatures.

An agreement between the founder of Cardano, Charles Hoskinson, Ken Kodama the CEO of Emurgo and Michael Parsons led to internal restructuring of the Cardano Foundation. Following the restructuring process, their efforts seem to be yielding positive results.

The project has begun gaining traction within the community where the network is seeing a steady rise in the traffic on its website from around 200,000 to 400,000 in the period between February and April 2019 as per the data provided by SimilarWeb.

In addition to that, there has been a steady growth on the networks social media channels as well in the period starting January 2019. Cardano subreddit increased from roughly 50,000 members to about 70,000 (data from Reddit metrics). Twitter, on the other hand, has seen a month-over-month average from 1,000 to 2,550 representing 155% increase according to Social Blade.

Source: https://www.fxstreet.com/cryptocurrencies/news/cardano-ada-revamps-the-marketing-strategy-subreddit-and-twiter-channels-grow-massively-201905081022

Why marketing to seniors is so terrible

Honest question: When was the last time you saw anyone over 55 in a decent ad? The world of oldsvertising is a hellscape full of reverse mortgages, erectile dysfunction pills, and bathtubs that won’t kill you.

If you took your entire view of the human race from primetime advertising alone, you’d see a society without old people. They don’t work, they don’t drink beer, they don’t drive cars. They don’t exist. According to Havas Group, only about 5% of U.S. advertising is even aimed at people over 50.

And yet by 2020, the world will have more 55-year-olds than 5-year-olds, and older people are expected to generate half of all urban consumption growth between 2015 and 2030. The U.S. Census Bureau has pegged 2035 as the year older adults will outnumber chil­dren for the first time in U.S. history. By 2060 in China, one in three people–or 487 million–will be over 60. As far as brands are concerned, that’s a lot of potential sales.

But forget about balancing between Instagram and “I’ve fallen but I can’t get up.” These statistics, along with more recent studies around how consumers want to see different generations depicted and reflected in culture, are starting to shift how some marketers try to lure different age groups.

SO WHY IS MARKETING TO OLDER PEOPLE SO BAD?

Major brand marketers over the years have demonstrated a distinct obsession with age. People are segmented off into age ranges like 18 to 34, 35 to 50, and over-55, as if our buying patterns, motivation, and lifestyles are homogenous and based primarily on how many years we’ve been alive. Life stage and age have been decoupling over the past generation, with milestones like education, marriage, kids, career, and retirement becoming unmoored from traditional age constraints. A 2018 study conducted by McCann and The Paley Center for Media asked people of all ages when you’re too old to do things like go back to school, start your own business, or date romantically, and an overwhelming majority of respondents said you’re never too old for any of it, putting into question the focus on age as a reliable indicator of consumer habits.

However, most advertisers still see the next generation as always the most exciting. Are you sick of gen Z headlines yet? They’re new, they’re different, their disposable income habits are not yet fully formed! When asked about AB InBev’s Super Bowl strategy in 2015, the brewer’s VP of global marketing strategy Jorn Socquet said, “It’s moving towards a different tone of voice. It will be more young, it will be a little more fun-based. So you will definitely see an evolution.” And last year, Tiffany’s chief artistic officer Reed Krakoff told me the brand has been experimenting and pushing itself to find the right balance between leveraging the enormous brand value in its heritage, “while at the same time not letting it become an albatross around its neck, preventing it from attracting newer, younger people into its doors.” The brand’s 2018 “Believe in Dreams” campaign featured both Elle Fanning (then 20) and A$AP Ferg (then 30).

There is some logic behind the strategy of targeting younger consumers. According to Forrester research, 55% and 54% of those less than 31 and 31-39, respectively, say they “enjoy trying new brands or products.” That number drops to 39% for those aged 54-63 and 31% for the 64-74 set. Forrester analyst Dipanjan Chatterjee says it’s possible that marketers see no quick win here among less promiscuous consumers who are unwilling to switch for quick inducements. “This may also reflect a mind-set among many brands where marketers are rewarded for acquisition after which the customer gets passed on to some other part of the organization,” says Chatterjee. And so the most creative, high-production campaigns tend to focus on the youngest consumers, while marketing aimed at older groups follows mindless formulas and plays into time-worn stereotypes about older people as needy and helpless.

THE REAL OPPORTUNITY OF MARKETING TO OLDER PEOPLE

But stats like those cited by Forrester can be misleading. On the flipside, Havas Group’s chief insights officer and SVP brand marketing at Vivendi Maria Garrido says talking directly to older people is a huge missed opportunity, not just because of their disposable income, but it’s also a group that is generally more sincere with brands. “They want brands to provide content that’s educational, informative, and more than just entertainment,” says Garrido. “They’re more sincere in that when they have a good experience with a brand, 68% say they share it with other people.”

Havas’s 2018 Meaningful Brands study found massive growth in the online presence of over-55 consumers, with 68% of them also buying something online every month.

Aside from healthcare, luxury is the product segment where Havas has seen more brands actively engaging with older consumers. And for good reason, since Euromonitor reported that 70% of all available U.S. income is owned by those over 55, and, globally, people over 60 will account for $15 trillion in spending power by 2020. “A lot of luxury brands are doing things with older models, showcasing an older target group,” says Garrido. “Part of that is affordability. I was having lunch with someone the other day from Chanel who told me that 80% of their fashion is sold to people over the age of 50. Most people don’t have the accumulated wealth to pay $2,000 for a jacket.”

THE RISE OF MULTIGENERATIONAL ADVERTISING

 There are brands that are finding ways of reflecting the reality that we live in a–shocker!–multigenerational society. L’Oreal Paris and British Vogue recently partnered to launch “The Non-Issue,” created with McCann London and Paris, a print insert in the May edition of British Vogue. Featuring older women like Jane Fonda and Helen Mirren, the aim was to celebrate women over 50, who feel ignored by the fashion and beauty industries.

Not all brands have completely ignored older consumers. While the bulk of advertising seems to follow an unspoken “No Olds” rule, some brands have managed to create multigenerational ads (either in whom they depict or who the target audience is) that stand out. In 2011, Toyota used a Venza ad to subvert expectations of a less-than thrilling, almost-empty nester lifestyle.

FOCUS ON ATTITUDES, NOT AGES

Perhaps focusing on age groups is the wrong approach altogether. The 2018 McCann study “Truth About Age” found that aging is actually something everyone thinks about. Its data showed that people in their 20s fear death the most, those in their 30s think about aging the most, while people in their 70s actually worry about aging the least. The report suggested marketers should shift from age to attitudinal segmentation. So instead of age ranges, it outlined five different attitudes: Ageless Adventurers, Communal Caretakers, Actualizing Adults, Youth Chasers, and Future Fearers.

Nadia Tuma, senior vice president and director of McCann Truth Central (the agency’s research unit), says that even if you just look at one small segment like empty nesters, you’ll get a kaleidoscope of different attitudes toward growing older, from excitement to fear, optimistic to apocalyptic. Similarly, if you filter it through culture, looking at how China compares to France, say, you start to get a very different picture of how different people think about aging. “It’s almost like the demographics that we’ve created are a barrier to us understanding people at a deeper level,” says Tuma.

THE ONE UNIVERSAL TRUTH ABOUT AGING

The most surprising finding Tuma and her team discovered was when they asked people to envision an aging utopia–and an aging dystopia. In every single country surveyed, the utopia had generations living together in harmony, learning from each other, and helping one another other. The dystopia, conversely, strictly segregated young and old. Which one do we see most in advertising today?

“The vast majority of people said aging well means spending time with people who are both younger and older than you,” says Tuma. “It’s about intergenerational connections, something much more powerful than just finding a good moisturizer.”

Source:https://www.fastcompany.com/90341477/why-marketing-to-seniors-is-so-terrible?partner=rss

5 email marketing tools for startups

Traffic generation techniques and driving branding through digital marketing has been talked about so extensively already that we do not need to review them any more. 

Almost any startup can learn to use Google Ads, Facebook Ads, content and organic search engine optimisation (SEO) to get traffic at the top of their funnel. These are great ways to get the word out and making the brand visible. 

However, in order to nurture your leads and keep your customers engaged, you need to master email marketing. 

Email marketing remains the most powerful channel to communicate directly with the people who want to hear from you. This includes your blog’s content audience, your customers, people who want to work with you in the future, and your leads for the products and services you plan to sell.

When people sign up for a service, the most important initial communication, like login details, receipt of purchase, etc, is expected to be communicated over email. This also includes sending out relevant and personalised content so that you have your subscribers’ undivided attention. 

Relevance in the times of instant communication

Many digital marketing experts claim that email marketing is dead because of the rise of Twitter, Instagram, and other social media platforms and, most importantly, instant communication apps such as Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp. But email still continues to drive revenues at our startup and for thousands of other startups in the world.

Email marketing works when email subscribers expect to receive an email from you. Else, unsolicited emails are just spam.

Many startups have tried to use email marketing to drive brand awareness and instant sales, but it doesn’t work. That’s when people claim email marketing is dead. But the problem lies in the fact that people have little to no idea about how to do it correctly.

The permission to reach the inbox of the subscriber should be used judicially and nurtured over time with relevant content.

Email marketing is personal because the email inbox is a personal space. And people like to hear from people, rather than brand names, because people want to connect with people. (Read Seth Godin’s Permission Marketing, if you haven’t read it yet). 

When people give you permission to communicate with them, and you carefully nurture that permission without abusing it with promotional messages, email marketing can work wonders. 

In this article, I want to talk about the top five email marketing tools that startups can use. These tools are pocket-friendly, have an easy on-boarding procedure, and come with the basic set of features that startups can use without the need to have a tech team.

Awhile back, email marketing software was not cheap and one had to pay heavy upfront costs to get things up and running. Most of the email marketing tools in the market nowadays will charge you based on the total amount of email subscribers you have hosted with them. That way you are not going to incur heavy upfront costs like setup fee. You will pay more only when your business grows along with it. 

Most of these email marketing tools come with a free trial or a money-back guarantee. You can experiment with multiple tools without risking money and find the best fit for you. 

So here goes my list:

ConvertKit

ConvertKit is one of my favourite email marketing tools. Their interface is simple and easy to use. Nathan Barry, Founder of ConvertKit, is a designer himself, and he has taken a personal interest in designing the user interface.

The ConvertKit plan starts with $29 a month for up to 1,000 subscribers. If you have 10,000 subscribers, you would pay $119 a month. The cost goes up based on the number of subscribers you have.

ConvertKit is the only tool that allows unlimited email sending for any given number of subscribers you have. Most of the email marketing tools have a sending limit of seven to 12 emails per subscriber per month, and if you send more emails, you will be billed separately.

For example, if you have 1,00,000 subscribers, you will be able to send a total of 5,00,000 emails a month and if you send another 5,00,000 emails to the same subscriber base, you will be charged the equivalent of having 2,00,000 subscribers. Such pricing is unpredictable and gives early-stage startups surprise bills.

ConvertKit is made for bloggers and info-product marketers, but it works for anyone who has a focus on personal branding.

Many email marketing tools come with a lot of bells and whistles, which include fancy HTML email templates. ConvertKit keeps the focus on the conversation and doesn’t encourage you to add fancy designs. The email editor is plain and simple, and your HTML emails look more like plain text emails. 

If you are looking to send heavy branded HTML emails, then ConvertKit might not be the right option for you. However, if you are trying to leverage 1:1 communication with your subscribers with written content, ConvertKit is the best fit for you.

ConvertKit also has the best delivery rate in the industry and has a high conversion ratio for emails sends to opens. They have maintained the reputation of their email servers very well by carefully monitoring all the users and preventing spam complaints.

One downside of ConvertKit is that they do not support highly customisable automation. If you are looking to build custom marketing automation funnels, then ActiveCampaign might be a better fit for you.

ActiveCampaign

There are three reasons why ActiveCampaign is better than ConvertKit. The pricing of ActiveCampaign is slightly lower than ConvertKit at higher subscriber slabs.

For 1,000 subscribers the monthly pricing plan starts at $29 a month – which is almost the same as ConvertKit. If you have 10,000 subscribers, the pricing is $129 a month.

At higher subscriber slabs, there are significant differences in pricing. If you have 100,000 subscribers, you will be paying $459 a month for the Lite Plan on ActiveCampaign, and $679 a month for ConvertKit.

While ConvertKit doesn’t have multiple plans, ActiveCampaign comes with four different plans.

The Lite plan of ConvertKit is good enough for most of the bloggers, information product marketers, and startups. If you also want sales automation with features like Lead Scoring, then the Plus plan will be the right fit for you.

The professional plan comes with predictive sending and site messaging. And there is also an enterprise plan for people who want to customise the entire offering. 

ActiveCampaign allows you to add webhooks in the automation, which helps you pass data to other tools. You can also set up an SMS drip campaign with ActiveCampaign – which is not available with tools like ConvertKit.

If you have a lot of subscribers, are very price conscious, and if you want to have the possibility of upgrading to a CRM automation suite in the future with the same subscriber database, I would recommend ActiveCampaign over ConvertKit.

The only downside of ActiveCampaign is that the tool is much more complex to use than ConvertKit. You might find it difficult to create a simple drip marketing automation and finding an email template that looks like plain text emails (if plain text emails are your preference). 

Aweber

Aweber is one of the oldest email marketing companies in the world. Aweber has a very simple interface and allows users to send plain text emails. Plain text emails have a higher chance of landing in the primary tab of Gmail (and 90 percent of internet users who use email are on Gmail). 

Aweber has high-reputation email servers that have built trust with the email ISPs over the years. This helps to get very high delivery rates and open rates for your email campaigns.

The pricing of Aweber is very simple. The basic plan for 500 subscribers comes at $19 a month. If you have 10,000 subscribers, it would cost $69 a month. It’s $149 a month for up to 25,000 subscribers. And beyond that, it’s $8 additional for every 1,000 new subscribers that are added to the database. 

Aweber supports the creation of a simple drip marketing campaign but is not the best tool to build complex automation.

Drip.com

Drip is one of the most sophistical email marketing and CRM tools out there in the market. 

Initially Drip was competing against ActiveCampaign and ConvertKit with the same set of features and pricing. Later Drip has rebranded itself into a communication tool for e-commerce companies.

If you are an ecommerce startup, Drip.com might be the right option for you as they have custom built the features keeping in mind the needs of an ecommerce startup.

The pricing starts at $49 a month for 2,500 subscribers and goes up to $1,300 per month for 100,000 subscribers. Drip.com is the highest priced tool on my list.

Drip allows advanced rules and liquid templating, which helps you dynamically change the content on the email based on Subscriber tags. Unless you are an ecommerce startup, I wouldn’t recommend using Drip.com. 

MailChimp

Any mention of email marketing tools for startups brings MailChimp into the conversation. MailChimp is the largest provider of email marketing services for the internet, and one of the oldest and most profitable companies in this field.

MailChimp is the only tool that comes with a free plan. For up to 2,000 subscribers, there is no cost. You can upload your subscribers and send emails for free. Just make sure that the subscriber list you have is an option subscriber list. If your email campaigns have a high spam complaint rate and bounce rate, MailChimp will immediately ban your account. 

If you want all the features of MailChimp that include marketing automation, I recommend the Pro plan. It costs $199 a month, and then additional pricing based on the number of subscribers you have. For 1,00,000 subscribers, you will pay $475 per month plus $199 a month, which puts you at a cost of $674 per month.

MailChimp, being a leader in the email marketing field, has the best email servers that help you get the best delivery and open rates for your email marketing campaigns. Advanced automation is still difficult with MailChimp and the learning curve is steep.

The pricing is very similar to ConvertKit. And ActiveCampaign is much cheaper with a better set of features. 

Final thoughts

My personal recommendation for the best email marketing tools will be ConvertKit, and ActiveCampaign. Both have a compelling set of features, come with flexible pricing, and have great customer support. 

I wouldn’t recommend setting up your own email server for sending emails. Setting up your own server is complex and there are too many chances of failure. Signing up for an email marketing service provider is always easy and gives you peace of mind as you scale up your business. 

Source:https://yourstory.com/2019/05/email-marketing-tools-digital-solutions-startups